Selden Standard

15 new sandwiches that are already Detroit classics

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Firebird Tavern

Read the complete Thrillist article.

Thrillist has compiled this tasty menu of …

15 NEW SANDWICHES THAT ARE ALREADY DETROIT CLASSICS

“With so many nationally famous sandwiches – the Yardbird at SLOWS BAR BQ, the chicken shawarma at Bucharest Grill, the Mudgie at Mudgie’s, Green Dot’s mystery meats, all of the corned beefs – it’s hard for a new sandwich to “steak” (get it???) its claim to fame in Detroit. So, we looked specifically at restaurants that opened in the last couple of years for the best of Detroit’s new class of sandwiches.”

PBLT – Dime Store, 719 Griswold
Smoked pastrami – Selden Standard, 3921 Second Ave.
Bánh mì & Malibu’s Meatball – Gold Cash Gold Detroit, 2100 Michigan Ave.
Shrimp Po’ Boy – WALA, 1010 Washington Blvd.
Spicy Asian pulled pork sammy – Rock City Eatery, 11411 Jos. Campau
Cuban sandwich – La Nena’s Restaurant – 8600 W. Vernor
Litte Italy – Rubbed, 2015 Michigan Ave.
Lew Silver Bagel Sandwich – Detroit Institute of Bagels, 1236 Michigan
“Catfish” tofu fillet sandwich – Detroit Vegan Soul (D.V.S), 8026 Agnes St.
Hammer of the Gods – McShane’s Pub & Whiskey Bar, 1460 Michigan
Ploughman’s – The Brooklyn Street Local, 1266 Michigan Ave.
Breakfast BBQ sandwich – Maccabees at Midtown, 5057 Woodward Ave.
Fried Green BLT – Firebird Tavern, 419 Monroe St.
Rabbit sandwich – Rose’s Fine Food, 10551 E. Jefferson Ave.

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Saveur Magazine: “Destination: Detroit”

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Read the full article.

With its sprawling geography and revved-up food scene, the Motor City is the perfect setting for a one-day road trip.

Those of us who know and love Detroit consider it a kind of half-finished heaven. We favor its brawny, threadbare aura, its onion-and-mustard-spangled coney dogs, its rambling thoroughfares from a time when Cadillac Eldorados ruled the roads. The city’s lonely Gothic churches, historic Art Deco skyscrapers, and spacious island park are joined by a vast network of urban farms growing all sorts of delicious, fresh things in between swaths of concrete jungle. These farms, together with the city’s new restaurants dispersed in pockets all over town, make an urban road trip the best way to explore Motown.

Read why John O’Connor recommends visits to Anthology Coffee, Rose’s Fine Food, The Heidelberg Project, Eastern Market, Selden Standard, & Detroit City Distillery – and how to do it on a one-day trip.

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How four young chefs ignited Detroit’s restaurant renaissance

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The Root   Top of the Pontch chef

Rocky City Eatery   Selden
Top: James Rigato, The Root … Justin Vaiciunas, Top of the Pontch
Bottom: Nikita Sanches, Rock City Eatery … Andy Hollyday, Selden Standard

Originally published by Southeast Michigan Startup

Back in May 2012, our partners at Metromode introduced you to metro Detroit chefs on the cusp of making a serious impact in the under-appreciated, and then mostly underwhelming, local culinary scene. Oh my, what a difference a few years can make!

Now, metro Detroit’s dining scene is having a serious moment – one that has been a long time coming and one that might have been hailed a bit too preemptively, but is certainly making good on its promise.

With national attention on Detroit, a palpable DIY creative energy, and our notoriously low rents, local chefs have flourished. Ex-pats have returned home and are making national headlines with their work in local kitchens, and chefs from America’s culinary capitals have even been imported into the city to much acclaim. What was, nearly three years ago, a question of “Why not us?” has in turn become a bold proclamation of “here we are.”

With that in mind, we now check in on our four chefs from that (dare we say visionary?) 2012 article to look at where our then-“Almost Famous” and now legitimately actually famous chefs are today.

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To understand change in Midtown Detroit, look to Alexandrine Street

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Aaron_Timlin

Originally published by Model D.

A block north of Redmond Plaza [Second Avenue and Selden Street], the changing face of Midtown Detroit is most acutely visible. More than $40 million is being invested in the renovation of buildings — big and small — along the three blocks of West Alexandrine between Woodward Avenue and Third Street. It’s here where some of the city’s newest marquee business have set up shop.

Slows To Go opened at Cass and West Alexandrine in late 2010. Great Lakes Coffee Roasting Co.‘s Detroit location followed a year later at the corner of Woodward and West Alexandrine.  Selden Standard, recently named the restaurant of the year by the Detroit Free Press, opened last fall on Second between Selden and West Alexandrine. The old Tom Boy Super Market (a small yet infamous grocery store) closed last year and is set to reopen as a yet-to-be-announced retail development later this year.

Work began on the multi-million dollar renovation of the Rainier Court Apartments at the corner of Third and West Alexandrine last fall. The folks behind the Green Garage are nearly done transforming the ornate El Moore building into apartments with “urban cabins” on the roof.  Former Curbed Detroit editor Sarah F. Cox and her partner Mark R. Beard are on the brink of finishing the renovation of a Victorian mansion at Second and West Alexandrine, turning it into a small, mixed-use, multi-unit building. Condos are selling at 434 West Alexandrine for just under $200,000 and in Wayne State University’s old Mortuary Science Building for well in excess of $300,000.

The largest project on the street, however, is the $28 million renovation of the old Strathmore Hotel just west of Woodward. Midtown Detroit Inc., the economic development organization for the neighborhood, spearheaded the redevelopment of the long-abandoned, eight-story building.

Read the full article here.

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From almost famous to truly famous: Metro Detroit’s up-and-coming chefs have arrived

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JAMES RIGATO-THE ROOT

Originally published in MetroMode

Back in May 2012, we introduced you to metro Detroit chefs on the cusp of making a serious impact in the under-appreciated, and then mostly underwhelming, local culinary scene. Oh my, what a difference a few years make!

Now, metro Detroit’s dining scene is having a serious moment – one that has been a long time coming and one that might have been hailed a bit too preemptively, but is certainly making good on its promise.

With national attention on Detroit, a palpable DIY creative energy, and our notoriously low rents, local chefs have flourished. Ex-pats have returned home and are making national headlines with their work in local kitchens, and chefs from American culinary capitals around the nation have even been imported into the city to much acclaim. What was, nearly three years ago, a question of “Why not us?” has in turn become a bold proclamation of “here we are.”

With that in mind, we now check in on our four chefs from that, dare we say, visionary article, to look at where our then-“Almost Famous” and now legitimately actually famous chefs are today.

Andy Hollyday, Executive Chef and partner at Selden Standard, Detroit

Justin Vaiciunas, Executive Chef at Top of the Pontch, Detroit

James Rigato, Executive Chef at The Root, White Lake

Nikita Sanches, Chef/Owner at Rock City Eatery and Campau Tower, Hamtramck 

Read the full update here.

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